ARTICLE

Usefulness of hypertensive blood pressure response during a single-stage exercise test to predict long-term outcome in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

Am J Cardiol. 2008 Oct 1;102(7):921-6. de Liefde II, Hoeks SE, van Gestel YR, Bax JJ, Klein J, van Domburg RT, Poldermans D. Department of Anesthesiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The prognostic value of a hypertensive blood pressure (BP) response is still unclear. Therefore, the prognostic value of a hypertensive BP response in patients during single-stage exercise testing for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) on long-term mortality and major adverse cerebrovascular and cardiac events (MACCEs) was investigated. In addition, effects of statin, beta-blocker, and aspirin use in patients with known or suspected PAD were studied. A total of 2,109 patients were enrolled in an observational prospective study from 1993 to 2005. Hypertensive BP response was defined as an increase in systolic BP >/=55 mm Hg (95(th) percentile within our population) after a single-stage treadmill exercise test. The outcome was obtained by using the civil registries, and a questionnaire about cardiac events was sent to all survivals. Hypertensive BP response was associated with increased risk of long-term mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12 to 1.80) and MACCEs (HR 1.47, 95% CI 1.09 to 1.97). After adjustments for clinical risk factors and propensity score, baseline statin use was associated with reduced risk of long-term mortality (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.79), and statin, beta-blocker, and aspirin use were associated with reduced risk of MACCEs (HR 0.59, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.81; HR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.95; HR 0.73, 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.92, respectively).

In conclusion, hypertensive BP response at exercise in patients with known or suspected PAD is an important independent risk factor for all-cause long-term mortality and MACCEs, whereas statin, beta-blocker, and aspirin use were associated with an improved outcome.

 

retour

 

copyright |